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CSIEME Program: Orientation Sessions

Library guide in support of the CSIEME Program in the College of Education

APA Formatting

APA Style Resources

Managing your Citations

I recommend setting up a RefWorks account to manage citations. See the Coursework tab for more information. Other options include Mendeley

Online Tutorials and Workshops

Using Other People's Ideas

Whenever you use someone's ideas in a paper or project, it's important to give them credit by citing them. This short video shows the different ways to use other people's ideas in your projects and papers.

Make sure to use the appropriate citation style for your course work. In Education, this is usually APA. 

You need to include two parts each time you use or refer to someone else's ideas in your work: 1) an in-text citation that identifies where you used someone's ideas in your work 2) a citation with detailed information about the source you used, which goes in a Reference list at the end of your paper.

APA Examples

Notes on the Examples Above

  • author names are always given last name, first initial (ex: Obama, B.)
  • titles of articles, chapters, specific web pages, and books capitalize only the first word, proper nouns, and the first word after punctuation
  • titles of journals follow whatever capitalization the journal uses
  • volume numbers are italicized while issue numbers are not
  • doi is a permanent identifier for journal articles to make them easier to find. If no doi is available, include a link to the general Website of the publisher (this should be quite short and NOT go to the specific journal)
  • dates are always in the order year month day with a comma between year and month. 

Parenthetical Citations

Each item in your Works Cited page should be a source that was quoted or paraphrased in your paper. Whenever you quote or paraphrase, you must identify the author, the year, and the page number (if one is available). This can be formatted in a few different ways depending on whether you name the author in your sentence and whether your quote is at the end of the sentence.

Author (YYYY) argues that “you must cite” (p. ##).

It has been argued that “you must cite” (Author, YYYY, p. ##).

“You must cite” Author (YYYY) argues (p. ##).

It has been argued that “you must cite” (Author, YYYY, p. ##) in order to avoid accusations of plagiarism.

The study demonstrates “the need to continually emphasise that plagiarism is a breach of academic guidelines and that breaches will be regarded as a serious offence” (Risquez et al., 2013 p. 42).

Risquez (2013) believes in “the need to continually emphasise that plagiarism is a breach of academic guidelines and that breaches will be regarded as a serious offence” (p. 42).  

Kohlman (2016) believes “intersectionality has refashioned” feminism “by noting the ways in which men and women occupy variant positions of power and privilege across race, space, and time” (p. 34).

Some scholars argue that “intersectionality has refashioned” feminism “by noting the ways in which men and women occupy variant positions of power and privilege across race, space, and time” (Kohlman, 2016, p. 34).

According to Dessem (2017), “some locations were reportedly allocated as few as 20 packets of the precious chicken goop.”

Apparently “some locations were reportedly allocated as few as 20 packets of the precious chicken goop” (Dessem, 2017)

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