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Children's and Young Adult Literature: GN Research

This guide is a starting place for exploring children's and young adult literature

Graphic Novels in Education Articles

Brenna, B. (2013). How graphic novels support reading comprehension strategy development in childrenLiteracy, 47(2), 88-94.

Summary: A qualitative study involving 21 4th grader to determine which comprehension strategies could be applied to graphic novel reading and how graphic novels can support reading development.

Findings: Students were able to apply non-format specific comprehension strategies as well as graphic novel specific ones to their reading of graphic novels, and student interest in reading graphic novels increased throughout the study.  Teacher feedback stated that students became "voracious" readers regardless of the individual's prior reading motivation levels.


Brugar, K., Roberts, K., Jiménez, L., & Meyer, C. (2018). More Than Mere Motivation: Learning Specific Content Through Multimodal Narratives. Literacy Research and Instruction, 57(2), 183-208.

Summary: A study to determine the extent graphic novels support the comprehension of historical content in an English language arts class. 16 sixth graders were taught One Dead Spy.

Findings: After the unit was taught, there was a statistically significant increase in vocabulary recognition related to the American Revolution and all students were better able to discuss attributes of the American Revolution after reading One Dead Spy (although topics varied from student to student). “Historically accurate graphic novels can help build vocabulary and prior knowledge needed to scaffold students' engagement with historical texts… valuable language arts learning and historical learning can occur simultaneously.”


Cook, M. (2017). Now I “See”: The Impact of Graphic Novels on Reading Comprehension in High School English Classrooms. Literacy Research and Instruction, 56(1), 21-53.

Summary: Study to determine the effectiveness of graphic novels on reading comprehension.  217 high school students across five teachers were taught "The Cask of Amontillado" with either the original text, the graphic novel version, or both. 

Findings: Student with access to the graphic novel version of the text did significantly better on the comprehension test.  Teachers felt students with the graphic novel version were significantly more engaged. 


Wong, S. W. L., Miao, H., Cheng, R., & Yip, M. (2017). Graphic Novel Comprehension Among Learners with Differential Cognitive Styles and Reading Abilities. Reading & Writing Quarterly, 33(5), 412-427.

Summary: Study to determine the effects of graphic novels on ELL student reading comprehension and cognitive styles.  188 first year, native Chinese speaking undergraduate students were tested for reading comprehension based on traditional text or comics format, taking into account cognitive learning styles, English proficiency, and prior experience with comics.

Findings: Statistically significant higher performance in comprehension for students reading the comic format vs. the traditional text.  Students who read the comic format expressed more interest in consulting additional texts on the subject. 

Hughes, J.M., King, A., Perkins, P., & Fuke, V. (2011). Adolescents and "autographics": Reading and writing coming-of-age graphic novels. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 54(8), 601-612.

Summary: Two related case studies with 12 “reluctant” high school students where the students had to read graphic novels and develop their own comic book based on personal experiences.  

Findings: Students who typically saw themselves as non-readers or who were disengaged from reading and writing found the assignments engaging.  The graphic novels were an appealing alternative to traditional texts, and students who had a hard time expressing themselves in writing were able to do so in a graphic novel format despite fears of their artistic abilities. 


Schmidt, J. (2011). Graphic Novels in the Classroom: Curriculum Design, Implementation, and Reflection. English Journal, 100(5), 104-107.

Summary: A case study of a remedial undergraduate English Skills course where the professor used graphic novels and assignment scaffolding to build student confidence, research/writing skills, and reading motivation. 

 

 

 

 


Hughes, J.M., King, A., Perkins, P., & Fuke, V. (2011). Adolescents and "autographics": Reading and writing coming-of-age graphic novels. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 54(8), 601-612.

Summary: Two related case studies with 12 “reluctant” high school students where the students had to read graphic novels and develop their own comic book based on personal experiences.  

Findings: Students who typically saw themselves as non-readers or who were disengaged from reading and writing found the assignments engaging.  The graphic novels were an appealing alternative to traditional texts, and students who had a hard time expressing themselves in writing were able to do so in a graphic novel format despite fears of their artistic abilities.


Schmidt, J. (2011). Graphic Novels in the Classroom: Curriculum Design, Implementation, and Reflection. English Journal, 100(5), 104-107.

Summary: A case study of a remedial undergraduate English Skills course where the professor used graphic novels and assignment scaffolding to build student confidence, research/writing skills, and reading motivation. 

Schmidt, J. (2011). Graphic Novels in the Classroom: Curriculum Design, Implementation, and Reflection. English Journal, 100(5), 104-107.

Summary: A case study of a remedial undergraduate English Skills course where the professor used graphic novels and assignment scaffolding to build student confidence, research/writing skills, and reading motivation. 


Wong, S. W. L., Miao, H., Cheng, R., & Yip, M. (2017). Graphic Novel Comprehension Among Learners with Differential Cognitive Styles and Reading Abilities. Reading & Writing Quarterly, 33(5), 412-427.

Summary: Study to determine the effects of graphic novels on ELL student reading comprehension and cognitive styles.  188 first year, native Chinese speaking undergraduate students were tested for reading comprehension based on traditional text or comics format, taking into account cognitive learning styles, English proficiency, and prior experience with comics.

Findings: Statistically significant higher performance in comprehension for students reading the comic format vs. the traditional text.  Students who read the comic format expressed more interest in consulting additional texts on the subject. 

Issa, S. (2018). Comics in the English classroom. A guide to teaching comics across English studiesJournal of Graphic Novels and Comics, 9(4), 310-328. 

Summary: Information on teaching comics in undergraduate English classrooms.  Includes samples lessons for English composition, TESOL, and creative writing courses.  Emphasis on the importance of not just reading comics in the curriculum but to also have students create comics in order to increase multimodal literacy. 


Schmidt, J. (2011). Graphic Novels in the Classroom: Curriculum Design, Implementation, and Reflection. English Journal, 100(5), 104-107.

Summary: A case study of a remedial undergraduate English Skills course where the professor used graphic novels and assignment scaffolding to build student confidence, research/writing skills, and reading motivation. 

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